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SOUTH CAROLINA

South Carolina

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    • Budget timeline: Annual 

      Fiscal Year starts: July 1

      The current state budget can be found here.

      Find the legislative session calendar here.

      Find the current legislative leaders here.

      SC Gov. Haley

      Gov. Nikki Haley
      Office of Governor Nikki Haley
      P.O. Box 12267
      Columbia, SC 29211
      Phone: (803) 734-2100
      Fax: (803) 734-5167

       

       

       

       

       

      Les Boles, Director
      Office of State Budget
      1122 Lady Street, 12th Floor
      Columbia, South Carolina 29201
      Phone (803) 734-2280
      Fax (803) 734-0645
      http://www.budget.sc.gov/OSB-index.phtm
      LBoles@budget.sc.gov

       

      Want a more robust, long-term look at your state's fiscal health, beyond the budget? There are two parts: Click here for the FY2011 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report compiled by the state government, and click here for information on the state's pension liabilities.

       

      South Carolina is required to pass a "balanced budget." Article 10, Section 7(a) of the 1895 Constitution requires a "budget process to insure that annual expenditures of state government may not exceed annual state revenue." In addition, Section 11-11-345 of the State law requires that if the year-end GAAP audit shows a deficit, any appropriation of surplus funds is suspended, and is used to offset the deficit. Regardless of these requirements, the State reported budget deficits (negative net transactions) on its Budgetary Comparison Schedule for the three years reviewed. South Carolina law forbids the carrying over of a deficit from one year to the next.

       

      Governmental funds include the General Fund, several (nine plus a tenth aggregated fund) Special Revenue funds, a Capital Projects Fund, and two Permanent funds. State law does not precisely define the State's basis of budgeting. In practice, however, it is the cash basis with some exceptions that are explained in Note 4 to the Required Supplementary Information-Budgetary. As seen in the State's data sheet, budgeted and actual revenues are reasonably in sync. The same cannot be said about expenditures. The State budgets the General Fund and Other Budgeted Funds. The State's CAFR does not reveal what funds are included in "Other Budgeted Funds."  [from the Institute for Truth in Accounting]

       

      Find the state's bond ratings here.

       

      SC policy logo

    • Medicaid :

    • HEADLINES

      Little-Known Health Act Fact: Prison Inmates Are Signing Up

      New York Times | by Erica Goode | March 11, 2014

      In a little-noticed outcome of President Obama’s Affordable Care Act, jails and prisons around the country are beginning to sign up inmates for health insurance under the law, taking advantage of the expansion of Medicaid that allows states to extend coverage to single and childless adults — a major part of the prison population.

    • HEADLINES: South Carolina

      First hearing planned on proposed SC Medicaid budget hike

      The State | by Adam Beam | December 3, 2013

      Lawmakers gave the agency an additional $110 million in general fund money for the 2014 budget. The agency is asking for an additional $165 million in the 2015 budget.

    • View All South Carolina articles
    • Higher Education :

    • HEADLINES

      Lawmakers Jockey Over Budget Surpluses

      Stateline | by Elaine S. Povich | April 22, 2014

      According to NASBO, Kentucky and many other states have put the emphasis on restoring funding to education this year. A still incomplete survey of states showed that the vast majority are increasing elementary and secondary education funding, along with transportation and infrastructure.

    • HEADLINES

      Education spending balloons, but students in some states get more money than others

      Washington Post - GovBeat | by Reid Wilson | January 27, 2014

      There is disagreement within education circles over whether spending more money per pupil leads to better results. But there is no disagreement that the amount of money states spend on education has erupted in recent years.

    • View All South Carolina articles
    • Courts & Corrections :

    • HEADLINES

      Little-Known Health Act Fact: Prison Inmates Are Signing Up

      New York Times | by Erica Goode | March 11, 2014

      In a little-noticed outcome of President Obama’s Affordable Care Act, jails and prisons around the country are beginning to sign up inmates for health insurance under the law, taking advantage of the expansion of Medicaid that allows states to extend coverage to single and childless adults — a major part of the prison population.

    • HEADLINES

      State spending on prison health care is exploding. Here's why.

      Washington Post | by Niraj Chokshi | November 1, 2013

      Health care and prisons are two of the biggest drivers of state spending. So, when you throw them together you get… a whole lot of state spending.

    • View All South Carolina articles
    • Solutions

      How Reality-Based Budgeting Can Permanently Resolve State Budget Gaps

      State Budget Solutions | by Bob Williams | November 7, 2012

      State Budget Solutions recommends that state legislators take action in 2013 to resolve the serious state financial crises by changing their focus from inputs to outcomes by redesigning budgets from the ground up based on priorities and performance.

    • Solutions

      How to Prevent Future Pension Crises

      by Cory Eucalitto | November 1, 2012

      The time for state and local governments to offer defined contribution retirement plans that protect both taxpayer dollars and public employee retirement security is now.

    • Solutions

      State Lawmakerís Guide to Evaluating Medicaid Expansion Projections

      The Heritage Foundation | by Edmund F. Haislmaier and Drew Gonshorowski | October 17, 2012

      Supporters of Obamacare claim that expanding Medicaid will entail little to no cost to state governments, since the federal government will fund the vast majority of the additional costs. Indeed, some analyses project states achieving savings from adopting the expansion. However, state lawmakers should be wary of accepting such analyses at face value.

    • Solutions

      Medicaid Is BrokenóLet the States Fix It

      The Wall Street Journal | by Paul Howard and Russell Sykes | October 15, 2012

      Block-granting Medicaid is the best way to deliver better, cost-effective care to the most vulnerable Americans.

    • Solutions

      The Case for Reform: Prisons

      Right on Crime | August 1, 2012

      Prisons are supremely important, but they are also a supremely expensive government program, and thus prison systems must be held to the highest standards of accountability.